Several large retailers likely thought that they were finally clear of legal problems relating to advertising sale prices for products that were not truly on sale.  With a post on September 28, 2016,, Dennis Hansen discussed these class action lawsuits, several which have settled for millions of dollars.  For example, JC Penny paid $50 million to settle a class action suit against it alleging that its advertised and listed sale prices were not actually sale prices, but were more akin to regular prices.  However, the bad news for these retailers continues as local government enforcement actions have now been brought.

The Los Angeles city attorney brought claims against Kohl’s, JC Penny, Macy’s and Sears based upon the same alleged conduct.  These lawsuits could subject these retailers to additional substantial penalties, on top of the money already spent on the consumer class actions.  Additionally, the Alameda County Attorney’s office recently brought claims against My Pillow for making health claims in its advertising that are allegedly not supported by any scientific research or studies.  My Pillow settled with Alameda County, agreeing to pay over $1 million in fines.

These actions brought by local governments are unique in that false advertising claims are usually left to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC”), consumer class actions, or lawsuits brought by competitors.   The FTC, however, does not have the resources to bring claims against all improper advertising, even focusing on just advertising relating to health claims.  However, these local government enforcement actions can somewhat fill that gap and give more effect to state statutes regulating advertising, such as California’s statute regarding what is a sale price.  As a result, it is important to make sure that you are aware of the advertising statutes in each state in which you are advertising, particularly if you are frequently listing a product as being on sale.  For example, in California, a sale price cannot be compared to a previous price (such as 50% off) unless that previous price was the actual market price of the product within the previous three months.  And, as always, all advertising claims, especially health claims, should be substantiated so that if a competitor, the government, or a consumer class action lawyer brings a claim, you are able to quickly show that the advertising is accurate.