U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Nearly every week it seems as though the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is sending out a new round of warning letters to companies marketing products and therapies as effectively treating or preventing COVID-19.  We previously wrote blog posts here and here about sets of such letters, and our colleague, Marissa Koblitz Kingman, recently wrote

The federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently issued a consumer update regarding products containing cannabis or cannabis-derived compounds, including cannabidiol (CBD).  Although aimed at consumers, the update contains important reminders for businesses marketing or selling these types of products.  The FDA’s website also includes lengthy Q&A guidance about its regulation of them.  A prior

Yesterday the Food & Drug Administration (“FDA”) Commissioner announced a new plan for increased oversight over dietary supplements.  In his statement, the Commissioner noted how much the dietary supplement market has grown and how many consumers now take a dietary supplement on a regular basis, stating that “consumers need to have access to safe, well-manufactured,

Soy milk. Almond milk. Coconut milk. With the increase in health-conscious shopping and non-dairy diets, these terms and others have become household names.

But the Food & Drug Administration (“FDA”) recently suggested these products don’t constitute milk at all, since they do not come from animals. According to multiple sources, during the Politico Pro

Fast food (hamburger fries and drink) illustrationFollowing upon on my earlier blog post about the Food & Drug Administration’s (“FDA”) menu labeling rule, which implements the nutrition labeling provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, the FDA recently released new supplemental guidance in advance of the current compliance deadline in May 2018.  This new guidance is meant

Pet products are subject to advertising, labeling, and safety-related laws and regulations just like any human product.  For an update on the Food & Drug Administration’s guidance on the compounding of animal drugs from bulk drug substances and the labeling of pet medications, see Nancy Halpern’s recent blog post on Fox Rothschild’s Animal Law blog. 

Last month, the Food & Drug Administration (“FDA”) sent a lengthy warning letter to Nashoba Brook Bakery, a bakery based in Massachusetts, identifying a number of alleged violations of food regulations and labeling regulations.  One such allegation was that the bakery’s Nashoba Granola product improperly listed “love” as an ingredient on its label.  Specifically, the