Retailers often use product reviews to supplement advertising and drive sales.  Such use has become more prevalent as sales shift from brick and mortar stores to internet sales, where splattering a webpage with purported product reviews is easy, cheap, and grabs eyeballs.

Online product reviews
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Many major online retailers offer product reviews submitted by consumers. Many online retailers will provide product reviews on their website that the company has solicited or otherwise selected for favorability. Such reviews are supposed to be authentic and accurate. While the retailer can select which reviews are displayed, the reviews should be real and the consumer can decide how much weight to give a review.  However, purported third party website reviews exist for the specific reason that they are supposed to be independent and will give the good and the bad. Several companies and individuals recently discovered that faking a third party review website will result in action from the FTC.

The website of Trampoline Safety of America purported to use experts to give safety ratings to different trampoline brands, rating those made by Infinity and Olympus Pro the highest.  However, what was not disclosed to consumers according to the FTC was that Trampoline Safety of America was operated by Infinity and Olympus Pro and the company owners.  According to the FTC the comments and videos on the website were also not authentic customer reviews, but were created by the owners of Infinity and Olympus Pro.  Following FTC action, the parties are heading toward settlement.

While such conduct is obviously improper, it is important always to disclose conflicts regarding product reviews and to only use consumer reviews or testimonials that are actually given by customers.  All factual claims, especially medical related claims, must be supported by actual data or testing.  Not only has the FTC shown a willingness to crack down on companies that violate such requirements, consumer protection lawyers and competitor companies can also be expected to bring claims and seek damages.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) requests that consumers report any issues they experience with FDA-regulated products so that the FDA can further protect the public health. But it isn’t always clear which products the FDA regulates and which products it doesn’t. Generally, the FDA regulates the following product categories: certain foods, drugs, biologics, medical devices, electronic products that give off radiation, cosmetics, veterinary products, and tobacco products. Within each category is a number of products subject to the FDA’s regulatory authority. A more detailed, though non-exhaustive, list of the products the FDA regulates can be found on the FDA’s website. According to the FDA, these products account for about one-fifth of annual spending by U.S. consumers.

FDA
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The FDA is committed to ensuring that the products it regulates are safe, effective, and correctly labeled. But the FDA does not pre-approve for safety and effectiveness all of the products it regulates before such products can be marketed and sold. For example, the FDA does pre-approve new drugs, biologics, and certain medical devices, but does not pre-approve cosmetics (with the exception of certain color additives) or dietary supplements (though a notification is required for those containing a new dietary ingredient). However, the FDA requires that cosmetics, dietary supplements, and other products be safe for their intended use and be properly labeled/advertised. Accordingly, for such products that the FDA does not pre-approve, the FDA still has regulatory authority to take action when a safety issue arises. With respect to tobacco products, the FDA does not regulate safety in the same way as with other products, as the FDA views tobacco use as a major threat to public health. Notably, last year, the FDA finalized a new rule extending its regulatory authority to all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, and restricting youth access to such products.

As always, companies should ensure that they products they market and sell are safe for their intended use, are properly labeled, and are fairly advertised. One form of advertising that has caught the FDA’s attention is the phrase “FDA Approved.” The FDA’s recently-updated explanation on what it does and doesn’t approve (and under what circumstances) can be found on the FDA’s website. The FDA’s website also contains detailed information for companies that market and sell FDA-regulated products, including the ability to search for guidance documents that describe the FDA’s interpretation on various regulatory issues and the ability to submit questions regarding the FDA’s policies, regulations, and regulatory process.